Fresno State's Hanna Cavinder, left, with sister Haley Cavinder, center, and head coach Jaime White, background right, in the game against UC Merced on Dec. 28, 2019, in Fresno, Calif. It is a man's world six months after the NCAA cleared the way for college athletes to earn money on their celebrity. Men lead the way in total name, image and likeness compensation and have more NIL activities than women. (Eric Paul Zamora/The Fresno Bee via AP)/The Fresno Bee via AP)

Fresno State’s Hanna Cavinder, left, with sister Haley Cavinder, center, and head coach Jaime White, background right, in the game against UC Merced on Dec. 28, 2019, in Fresno, Calif. It is a man’s world six months after the NCAA cleared the way for college athletes to earn money on their celebrity. Men lead the way in total name, image and likeness compensation and have more NIL activities than women. (Eric Paul Zamora/The Fresno Bee via AP)/The Fresno Bee via AP)

AP

Two of the main NIL compliance-platform and technology companies, INFLCR and Opendorse, have provided information about NCAA athlete compensation after the first six months (July 1 through Dec. 31, 2021). A glance, by the numbers:

59% vs. 41% — comparison between male athletes in Division I who have NIL activities vs. female athletes, according to INFLCR based on transactions reported by athletes using their system.

5 — women’s sports in the top 10 for NIL activities: track and field, volleyball, basketball, soccer and softball. NIL activities include licensing, social media posts, creating content and making appearances and signing autographs (INFLCR and Opendorse).

6 — women’s sports in the top 10 for NIL compensation: women’s basketball is second overall with 26.2%, and followed by volleyball, softball, track and field, gymnastics and swimming and diving (Opendorse).

67.4% — percentage of Division I male athletes who make up total NIL compensation (Opendorse).

32.6% — percentage of Division I female athletes who make up total NIL compensation (Opendorse).

$1,291 — average compensation for an athlete across Divisions I, II and III (INFLCR).

$1,036 — average compensation for a Division I athlete (Opendorse).

$51 — median compensation for an athlete across Divisions I, II and III (INFLCR).

21.7% — NIL compensation from social media posts (Opendorse/Front Office Sports white paper).

$933 — average NIL compensation for a YouTube video (Opendorse/Front Office Sports white paper).

$920 — average NIL compensation for TikTok post (Opendorse/Front Office Sports white paper).

$2,805 — average NIL compensation for a TikTok post from women’s basketball (Opendorse/Front Office Sports white paper).

$2,143 — average NIL compensation for a TikTok post from men’s basketball (Opendorse/Front Office Sports white paper).

$522 — average NIL compensation for Instagram post (Opendorse/Front Office Sports white paper).

$1,002 — average NIL compensation for an Instagram post from football (Opendorse/Front Office Sports white paper).

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Sources: INFLCR, Opendorse, Opendorse/Front Office Sports white paper

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